Memorials

In memory of the irreplaceable individuals whom we have cared for.

Though they are gone, they will never be forgotten, and we will continue to work towards a vegan world in their memory.

Guinevere

guin

Guinevere was only with us for a few weeks, but she had a huge personality and left a large hole in our hearts. She truly enjoyed being around people and loved to snuggle up in your lap. She lived with board members Linda & Alan Nelson after she was rescued. Our medical fund is named in her memory.

Coriander

coriander

Coriander was named for the herb, also known as cilantro. She was an Easter chick who was surrendered with her best friend, Beatrice, and cared for by Carolina Waterfowl Rescue. She and Beatrice were inseparable companions before Coriander died.

Autumn

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Autumn was picked up by the police after he was seen running around a local town. The police brought him to an animal hospital, and after a number of offers were made to take him and eat him, a caring person at the hospital contacted a vegan friend … and word got ’round to us! We picked him up and immediately were impressed by his feisty personality. He quickly bonded with another young rooster, Salem, and they were best friends up until Autumn’s death.

Hikaru

Hikaru (whose name means "radiance" in Japanese)--rescued from a local shelter after coming in as a stray.

Hikaru, whose name means “radiance” in Japanese, was a handsome rooster who was one of our first two rooster rescues (along with Orion). He was very confident but also very gentle in dealing with other chickens, and he was a great companion for the humans who cared for him.

Orion

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Orion was a Leghorn-mix rooster who was picked up by a local animal control department and kept at a shelter before Triangle Chance for All rescued him. He was very skittish around people at first, but warmed up a lot to humans. He was a true gentleman and a wonderful protector of the hens, who were always his primary focus. He grew to be quite friendly with people and even came to greet us in the evenings.

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Jewel and Jason were a tightly bonded pair of (we believe) Australorp chickens. As happens with many urban chicken flocks, Jason became a “nuisance” for, well, being a rooster, and was surrendered to a local shelter. Soon thereafter, Jewel was surrendered as well, and it was evident when watching them what an adorable pair they made. They were named in honor of our friends Jewel Johnson and Jason Kero of the Rooster Sanctuary at Danzig’s Roost in Colorado.

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Kotori and Harumi were an inseparable pair who were picked up as strays in Orange County when they were just a few weeks old. Kotori’s name means “lucky bird,” and Harumi’s name means “springtime beauty,” both in Japanese. They were very friendly, though very different. Harumi enjoyed hopping up on your shoulder when you were bending down or sitting nearby; Kotori was a “Zen hen” who was always to be found with her dear sister. They died about a week apart.

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Joy was a beautiful Australorp who came in to a local shelter as a stray. She was named after our good friend Joy Lasa Karuna, founder of Lasa Sanctuary. She came in not long after Jewel and Jason, but we are not certain that she came from the same flock. She was very curious, as well as patient, with her flock mates.

Helen

Helen

Helen was a meat breed hen who was rescued after she fell out of a transport truck on the way to the slaughterhouse. Since most meat chickens are slaughtered around six weeks old, she was just a baby. She suffered extensive injuries from her escape, and though she was receiving the best medical care possible, she succumbed to her injuries and died after a few days at the Microsanctuary. She was a beautiful, sweet hen who touched many people around the world with her bravery and strength.

Gabriel

OCAS rooster May 2016

Gabriel came to a local shelter as a stray. We arranged placement for him during his stray hold, and were ready to pull him when it ended. We were informed, however, that he could not be released until he was tested for four “reportable” poultry diseases in North Carolina. He tested positive for one, a very common bacterium affecting birds’ respiratory systems, and although he was asymptomatic, the shelter followed the Agriculture Department’s recommendations to “euthanize” (rather than release him to a rescue experienced with chicken care and treatment). The disease Gabriel was a carrier for “is of economic importance because infection can cause a drop in egg production,” though it is highly treatable with proper antibiotics, that is if they even ever show symptoms. He did not get a chance at a new life because his existence threatened the egg industry. His life was of no importance compared to humans’ desire to eat hens’ eggs, and he spent his final days on a cold concrete floor. We never got a chance to meet him, but we will always remember him.

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